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Friday, May 13, 2011

Life on the Road - Taking Photographs of Yourself!

When I travel I love to take photographs of everything, then I get home and there are no photos of me or my hubby. Oops! Well, I am learning to plan taking them. 

One of my followers asked how I took the photos of myself by the tombstones? I did have help from a couple of people but mostly I was on my own. If someone helps you check their work or you end up with eyes closed or something happens. 

I practiced before I went on this trip to Massachusetts with my camera.  I can use the remote or the timer on my Sony Cyber-shot digital camera. 


Sony Cyber-Shot
If you look closely in some of the photos you see me holding something in my hand and instead of smiling for the camera I am concentrating on what the camera is doing.  I thought it was distracting and took away from the subject of the photo.  The remote did make the shutter noise but if I was far away I could not hear it or any flashes that I could see.  So that was not working out.

So I decided to use the timer and it was set for 10 secs.  This means I have to move quickly and be careful I don't fall or trip on a tombstone. I remove my glasses, adjust my clothing, set up the timer and push the shutter release and move quickly positioning myself and smile nicely for the camera. I can see the flash from the front of the camera and when it flashes very fast several times I know it is taking the photo.

Of course, I have to put the camera on a tripod.  How do you carry a big huge tripod on the airplane? Well I don't. I have these lightweight ones and I put them into my checked baggage.  I look for ones that have a removable camera attachment part. I put that on the base of the camera and screw it in tightly using a quarter and check it frequently for they do loosen.  This means I can put the camera on the tripod quickly and secure it and then remove it when I need to use it alone. 


Tripod camera base removed from tripod

You need a screw hole in the bottom to attach the piece above.

Piece attached to the bottom of the camera using a quarter

The piece sits in the top area of the tripod and a lever is used to secure it!

Camera slipped onto the tripod and the latch on the base piece secured.
Please note that this tripod is not fully extended.  I usually extend the legs and get the tripod ready and because it is so lightweight it doesn't cause a problem carrying it.  Once at the site I set up the tripod, make sure it is stable.  Add the camera with the base piece and secure it.

I always check my photos after I take a picture of myself because it is very easy to cut your head off and that looks a little silly.  It is easy to get lost in studying the camera and not preparing my facial expression for the photo.

I really wanted more photos of myself like at Rowlandson's Rock but it was raining so hard that even my plastic bag was not working to keep the camera dry.  The problem is the rain runs here and there and everything gets wet.  My rain slicker's pockets has 1/2 inch of rain in them and I couldn't use them because the rain just rain off the slicker and into the pocket.  There was no way I could set up the tripod and walk away leaving the camera exposed to the rain.  Not a good idea!  So I will need to figure something else out for bad weather situations.  You don't always have the opportunity to return to the location and redo the photo.  This has possibilities and doesn't look too expensive.  http://www.warmcards.com/SJ1.html

2 comments:

Barbara Poole said...

Bonnie, I know I am the guilty one who asked you how you did the photos, and thanks for the nice reply.

Bonnie said...

It was a great question. We sometimes assume others know how something like that works. So who knows maybe another person will benefit too.